Project Pegasus Manufacturers present Results on Automated Driving

The partners of the Pegasus project presented the results of three and a half years of practical research and development to secure automated driving functions.
The partners of the Pegasus project presented the results of three and a half years of practical research and development to secure automated driving functions.

How is it proven that an automated vehicle is safe? The Pegasus joint project has set itself this task. On 13 May 2019, 17 partners from industry and science presented the results of three and a half years of R&D to secure automated driving functions.

In the Pegasus project Pegasus a procedure was developed, how a uniform evaluation and safeguarding of the driving function can take place as efficiently as possible. »We have already discussed the findings with experts both nationally and internationally during the course of the project to ensure that the results are also sustainable in practice,« explains Prof. Karsten Lemmer, DLR Executive Director for Transport and Energy and one of the two Pegasus coordinators. Prof. Thomas Form, Head of Vehicle Technology and Mobility Experience at Volkswagen and also project coordinator, adds: »With the development of requirements, processes, metrics and tools that interlock in a consistent overall method for releasing the driving function, Pegasus makes an important contribution to the subsequent approval of automated vehicles.«

At the Volkswagen test site in Ehra-Lessien near Wolfsburg, the project partners demonstrated the tool chain developed in the project to secure the automated driving function. They showed the individual steps necessary for the validation and approval of automated driving functions with digital posters, exhibits, (driving) simulators as well as exterior driving tests.

Requirements for Driving Function and Safety

In 2016, the project partners opted for a tangible application case, the so-called motorway chauffeur, to test the Pegasus approach, which is as universally applicable as possible, for securing a driving function. On motorways or expressways, it takes over vehicle guidance in a speed range from 0 to 130 km/h and can change lanes independently while the driver may engage in another activity.

With the collection of all requirements for the driving function and the collection of relevant traffic situations on the basis of field test, simulator and accident data, uniform processing in a central database and application in simulation, on the test site and in real traffic, the Pegasus overall method enables a continuous test sequence. Supported by process recommendations and the final safety evaluation, a release recommendation for the driving function results.

The tests in the project are particularly efficient due to the large number of simulation-based tests. Uniform interfaces are used, which also enables integration into existing environments. The simulation results are validated by tests on the test site. In particular, the simulation approaches are also suitable for the early phases of the development processes of automated vehicles. The previously manufacturer-specific procedure for testing and securing assistance functions is thus transferred by Pegasus into a new, general procedure in which all developers apply the same criteria and dimensions.