Editorial MOST150 is heading for Rollout

Christian Thiel is MOST Cooperation Administrator.
Christian Thiel is MOST Cooperation Administrator.

MOST technology is close to the major milestone of moving onto the roads with its third generation: MOST150. The MOST Cooperation is proud to announce that its core partner members Audi and Daimler will be the first carmakers to integrate MOST150 into series production vehicles.

Just recently, the number of vehicle models relying on the first two MOST genera-tions, MOST25 and MOST50, has hit the one hundred mark. Soon the next generation MOST150 will be on the road, offering unique advantages: a speed upgrade because of its further development of existing transmission technology and extensive support of digital video transmission and Ethernet applications.

MOST150 has the capacity to support full-fledged multi-seat infotainment systems with an up-to-date set of features. With the new packet channel, which is compatible with Ethernet, MOST150 enables the seamless integration of consumer electronics systems, Internet-based services, and established standards from the IT industry. Infotainment applications place many different demands on the network infrastructure, and MOST150 provides all the communication mechanisms over one interface.

Carmakers and suppliers are currently focused on rolling out MOST150 and, along with it, the latest generation of the MOST specifications, version 3.0. A lot of the experience they gather will be fed back to further improve this third generation of the MOST specifications. As always, a lot of work will need to go into this optimization and maintenance effort. But after the next generation is before another next generation: slowly but surely the MOST Cooperation is starting to look further into the future towards a new generation of MOST and the MOST specifications by considering various technology directions. Aspects under discussion include possible and reasonable bandwidth increases as well as upcoming driver assist and infotainment applications. For example, gigabit transmission over POF (polymeric optical fiber) or glass fiber is being examined, providing one look into the MOST future. 

Of course nobody has a crystal ball to get a glimpse of the future, but it is obvious, that some driver assist or infotainment systems might require the transmission of uncompressed video content. Even compressed content could require more bandwidth in the future if 3D and ultra-high resolutions become popular with consumers.

And who knows what other applica-tions might become popular, e.g. enabled by consumer electronics standards like USB 3.0. Yet one thing is clear as daylight: whatever they are, consumers will want to see them in their cars. And MOST will need to support them.

Please stay tuned - exciting highlights lie ahead of us within the MOST multimedia world.         

Dr. Christian Thiel MOST Cooperation Administrator